Welcome to Ashingdon Parish Council

Ashingdon Parish lies between Canewdon to the east, Hawkwell, Hockley and Hullbridge to the west, Rochford and Hawkwell to the south and the River Crouch and Maldon District and 4 of its parishes to the north.

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Latest Updates

Events & News

Winter Salt Scheme

Due to lack of volunteers, the Parish Council are unable to take part in the winter salt scheme this winter. The scheme was introduced by Essex County Council whereby volunteers would clear snow and spread salt along the pathway of priority areas in the parish. Thank...

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Contact us

Please contact us if you would like tell our Parish Council about topics which you or your group would like us to consider for improving Ashingdon and South Fambridge.

Ashingdon Parish Council,
33 Rowan Way,
Canewdon
Rochford
Essex
SS4 3PD

ashingdonparishcouncil@essexinfo.net

01702 257457

ANCIENT HISTORY OF ASHINGDON VILLAGE

The History of Ashingdon

Ashingdon has been a village for more than one thousand years. It was called “Nesenduna” in the 900s and 1000s and it has had many spellings over the centuries.

Ashingdon and South Fambridge have always been a part of Rochford District, previously called Rochford Hundred, which until the early 1800s included all of Southend on Sea Borough, 6 miles south of Ashingdon. Also in early times, Castle Point District District was part of Rochford Hundred. Rochford was called “Rochefort Hundret” in The Domesday Book. Other spellings in the Middle Ages were “Rochesfort” and “Rocheford”.

Our village appears in the Domesday Book produced for King William The Conqueror in 1085 and 1086. Other parts of Ashingdon Parish listed as villages or manors were : “Bacheneia” Beckney and “Phenbruge” South Fambridge. Other nearby villages or manors probably owning land in what is now Ashingdon were : “Carenduna” Canewdon, “Hocheleia” Hockley, “Hechuuella” Hawkwell, “Plumberga” Plumberow, “Puteseia” Pudsey and “Stanbruga” Great Stambridge. North Fambridge on the other side of the River Crouch was called “Fanbruge”.